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The schools are soon going to be breaking up for their nice long summer holiday break and depending on which school district you live in, this can mean that for up to 7 weeks the kids are at a loose end.

 

It can be an expensive time of year for many families, keeping your kids entertained while you’re at work, days out, or even babysitters. Some of you may have already booked a holiday abroad or in the UK, others may be holding off to see if you can find a good last-minute deal and others may not be able to go away at all. Whatever you have planned it is still a long time to keep your children entertained.

 

Monster.Travel have found some fun things that you can do in the city of London. Whether you are just looking for a day out or even a long weekend. A trip to London can definitely be educational as well as fun, there is so much to see and do, so much history for the kids to learn about, which they could learn without even knowing it.

 

Walking London

 

From wherever you may be travelling from, London is so easy to access. With the many undergrounds, and buses there’s no way that you should be stuck for something to see or do.

 

An easy start to seeing London is a start at Hyde Park Underground. From here you can walk through the Wellington Arch, through Green Park and down to see Her Majesty at Buckenham Palace. After some great photo opportunities and a bit of history on our Royal Family, take a walk through St James’s Park and down to Downing Street.

 

Now your really on your way at getting to see this beautiful city. From 10 Downing Street you can take a slow walk down to Westminster Abbey and Big Ben. Once across the Westminster Bridge it might be time for a stop, there are definitely so many places to stop and have a drink and some lunch and you will definitely see some great sights while people watching.

 

Hamleys Toy Shop

 

Hamleys is one of the largest and oldest toy shops in the world. Founder, William Hamley opened his first toy shop called ‘Noah’s Ark’ in 1760 and it was located in High Holburn, London. It was always William Hamley’s dream to open the best toy shop in the world and when the shop was passed down to his family, they honoured that and renamed the store Hamleys,

 

Hamleys was fast becoming a London landmark and in 1881 the flagship Regent Street branch opened. The store just kept getting bigger and better, filled with every toy you can imagine as well as toy theatres and miniature railways.

 

Unfortunately, in the late 1920’s Hamleys, like many other businesses in the area began to struggle and the shop was forced to close in 1931. Luckily, Hamleys was bought in 1938 by the Tri-Ang company and their chairman worked hard to bring customers back.

 

Today the store remains just as popular with the store holding regular fun events and ‘golden ticket’ discounts.

 

Going here with the kids could work out expensive but could also keep them entertained for hours. Maybe some good old-fashioned bribery to keep them being well behaved all day before you get there is the key.

 

The London Dungeon

 

Not for the fainthearted, The London Dungeon is a great day out for the family. This unique attraction will export you back to a time in London’s murky past. There are many live shows and rides for you to explore including ‘Guy Fawkes’ Gunpowder plot’, ‘The Torture Chamber’ ‘Jack the Ripper’, ‘The Tyrant Boat Ride’ and ‘Drop Dead: Drop Ride’. A new ‘Seance’ Show has also recently been introduced.

 

The London Dungeon recommend that the minimum age for children is 12, however that is not a strict rule. They believe it is at the discretion of the accompanying adult. It is advised that you gather information about all that is involved at the London Dungeon as tickets are non-refundable.

 

A great idea for an old English History lesson. The kids could definitely learn a lot about how our country used to work and who run it.

 

After the London Dungeons why not have a walk along to the Thames, jump on The London Eye and get the best possible views across the city. Save yourselves some money and take the family to the Jubilee Gardens and finish you day with a nice pre-packed picnic. From here you will get a great view of the London Eye and Big Ben. If they aren’t already very tired, let the kids run wild and blow of the rest of their steam in the Jubilee Gardens Playground.

 

 

Street Markets

 

London is widely known for its many street markets with Camden Market being one of the most popular, attracting more than 100,000 visitor each weekend. At Camden Market you will find plenty of shoe stores, clothes and unique, original gift ideas.

 

You can never say that you went hungry whilst walking around Camden Market, with all the amazing, local foods that you can find there.

 

Camden is definitely a place to teach the kids about culture. It’s an amazing warren of fashion, curiousness and a great haven for people watching. It’s a very popular area for many tourists, teenagers and punks. Camden is located by the Regents Canal, where you will see spectacles of buskers, a long with street actors, which will be great photo opportunities for the kids.  

 

After Your finished walking around this amazing market, why not treat the kids to an afternoon at London Zoo and the Regents Park formal gardens. A great family day out.

 

Notting Hill’s Portobello Road Market is possibly one the most famous street markets in the world, drawing in thousands of tourists each year. Portobello Road is a narrow street that is over two miles long and hosts a popular antique market every Saturday as well as a street market six days a week.

 

Portobello Road Market has over 1,000 dealers where you can find everything here from antiques, to fashion, second hand goods and fruit and veg. The market is open from 9am which means you can start early and take your time walking around, gathering in the sights without feeling rushed.

A great tip that the kids may enjoy is, Paddington Bear made a visit to his friend Mr. Grubers antique shop in Portobello Road in his film.

 

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